Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Today's Oscar Trivia #16

You know, one of the advantages of running all this Turner Classic Movies Oscar trivia every day is that it disguises the fact that I've only written about three substantive posts this month (okay, four, but who's counting). I'm going to miss it when TCM's 31 Days of Oscar marathon ends on March 3.

On the other hand, the daily posts tend to bury the long-form essays I do write. Like yesterday's essay, The Silent Oscars: 1906-1914, Part Three. I encourage you to check it out if only to see Asta Nielsen's hundred year old version of freak dancing. To quote Ralph Kramden, "Humina humina humina."

Now, on to today's trivia, courtesy of Turner Classic Movies, the classiest network on television:

Oscar Firsts What Italian actress became the first person to win an acting Oscar for a performance in a language other than English? (Hint: The film was released in the U.S. in 1961.)

It's An Honor Just To Be Nominated The man most nominated as Best Actor (Peter O'Toole), received the first of his eight nominations for Lawrence of Arabia (1962). Who directed the film?

Note: I think TCM meant that Peter O'Toole was the most nominated for Best Actor without winning. Here, by the way, are the films he was nominated for and the actor he lost to:

Lawrence of Arabia (1962) — Gregory Peck (To Kill A Mockingbird)

Becket (1964) — Rex Harrison (My Fair Lady)

The Lion in Winter (1968) — Cliff Robertson (Charly)

Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969) — John Wayne (True Grit)

The Ruling Class (1972) — Marlon Brando (The Godfather)

The Stunt Man (1980) — Robert De Niro (Raging Bull)

My Favorite Year (1982) — Ben Kingsley (Gandhi)

Venus (2006) — Forest Whitaker (The Last King of Scotland)

Even though I personally think Lawrence of Arabia is O'Toole's best performance, I'd bet 1968 is the one the Academy wishes it could do over. What do you think?

11 comments:

Zoe said...

hmm the first one i couldn't even guess.
second, why David Lean of course. interesting to see who peter o'toole has lost out to, he should of won for arabia and lion for sure!

Erik Beck said...

The first was Sophia Loren for Two Women, who, like Cliff Robertson, absolutely should not have won (my own choice is Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's).

I agree with you, Monkey. His Lawrence performance is one of the greatest in film history and should have won, but his Lion in Winter loss is the more egregious.

Mythical Monkey said...

my own choice is Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's

She's my choice, too. As is Peter O'Toole in Lawrence of Arabia, Gregory Peck notwithstanding. I think O'Toole as Lawrence is one of the greatest performances in history, and also the key to that movie's success -- re-cast the role with just about anybody else, and the movie implodes, I suspect.

Mythical Monkey said...

he should of won for arabia and lion for sure!

Katie-Bar-The-Door thinks the Academy should be able to revisit the Oscars from time to time, and say, "Oh, sorry, your performance hasn't held up. Give us back the award, we're giving it to the other guy."

Indeed, that's what the Katies are all about.

Katie said...

I don't remember saying that, but I agree with the Monkey. Case in point: Anna Paquin. Really? Really?

Ginger Ingenue said...

Ha. What movie did Anna Paquin win for?? :)

I could go google it, of course, but that's what I've hired you for, Jamison: to educate me, and to handle my Marx Brothers affairs -- on second thought, if this were the 1930s (as I pretend it is) I'd want to handle my own Marx Bros. affairs! ;)

Ginger Ingenue said...

Oh, and as for burying your long essays with shorter, daily posting: I've always had a hard time, not wanting to post something too soon after a longer post, or a good post, thinking, "No one's gonna read the essay-ish ones, anyway, especially if they can take the easy way out, and just read the short post on top."

So I often let the longer ones sit around for a while, but then it gets quiet, and boring, and even I lose interest!

Ha. But your blog is so good, and so bright and welcoming (I'm really thinking of changing my main blog color from black to white) that it's a welcome treat to find so many new entries! I do enjoy your longer ones, but the short ones make for varied reading. Like eating a few small meals after a heavy one.

-- I'm not sure where I'm going with this comment, Jamison. But something made me think...

Oh, yes! I remember...the essays.

See, today, I was tempted to come to the office and finish reading your series on the Marx Bros. -- I think I've read two or three parts of it so far -- and to read your first two entries preceding the Max Linder/Silent oscars piece.

So if the short daily posting gets more people in the door, it's your great essays that'll keep 'em indoors.

Unless, they go outdoors, but they had no right to go outdoors, and can't come back in! ;)

Ha. If I ever kill my blog, I'm gonna claim it wasn't killed, but eaten -- Moths eat it! Left-handed moths!!

I've been watching ANIMAL CRACKERS every night before going to sleep, and I think it's starting to permanently adhere itself to my brain. ;)

Yvette said...

Oh for sure, Peter O'Toole. He wuz robbed. I love Gregory Peck, but O'Toole branded that movie as his own. He and Lean made a god of Lawrence. I posted about some Brit films on my blog yesterday and LAWRENCE was my numero uno. :)

It is a stinking shame that this guy has never won an Oscar.

I liked Cliff Robertson in CHARLY. But, c'mon. O'Toole gave a classic performance.

Mythical Monkey said...

I posted about some Brit films on my blog yesterday and LAWRENCE was my numero uno. :)

I actually read your blog yesterday and think the line about O'Toole and Lean making a god of Lawrence is right on the money. He's like a fiery angel or something, some pure, ethereal creature, more than a man.

Katie-Bar-The-Door and I watched the first ninety minutes or so on TCM last night (despite already owning the DVD -- we started watching and didn't want to stop). O'Toole is just magnificent.

Mythical Monkey said...

So I often let the longer ones sit around for a while, but then it gets quiet, and boring, and even I lose interest!

That's what I usually do, but eventually the crickets start chirping. That or Mister Muleboy starts agitating for a photo of Louise Brooks or something.

Maybe with luck I can finish Part Four of the 1906-1914 essay before the weekend. It's about Mack Sennett, Roscoe Arbuckle, Mabel Normand and Charlie Chaplin.

Mythical Monkey said...

If I ever kill my blog, I'm gonna claim it wasn't killed, but eaten -- Moths eat it! Left-handed moths!!

Left-handed moths ... You know, I'd buy you a parachute if I thought it wouldn't open.

Hey, I got pair-a shoes!