Monday, October 11, 2010

Another Look At Gail Patrick

8 comments:

Who Am Us Anyway? said...

Ah Myth, you're the best. The order of photos is a work of art in itself, from the noir to the girl next door. I'm pretty sure sharing a pitcher of beer with Gail would be a mistake, but the drink looks so refreshing -- and the conversation so lively and innocent ... perhaps just one or two glasses ... :-)

hanner_da_nanner said...

youve been tagged!
:D
http://mmkayhanner.blogspot.com/2010/10/tagged.html

mister muleboy said...

Nuthin' fancy here.

Just plain country hardball. . . .



I'll show you my best pitch, and you see if you can hit it





hubba hubba hubba

Jean Siskill said...

Man do I love Gail Patrick.

She rocks that Godfrey flick like nobody's bidness.

I did not know, though, that she produced the television series.

Although I object to Raymond Burr as the lead in Perry Mason, I will concede that he offered us one of the greatest characterizations from that television thing.

She must have been responsible.

Damn she was good.

Damn she was lovely.

Mythical Monkey said...

youve been tagged!

Tagged, I'm it. Thanks hanner! I promise I'll get to work on it as soon as I finish my long-delayed post on Paul Muni. Oops, did I say "Paul Muni"? I meant to say "my post on whichever actor I've picked as the best dramatic actor of 1932-33."

Mythical Monkey said...

The order of photos is a work of art in itself, from the noir to the girl next door.

Thanks, Who. I'd like to say I just tossed five random photos up here, but I actually sorted through about three dozen Gail Patrick photos and then obsessively rearranged them until they looked right to me. Which is inherently nutty. Much like the entire Mythical Monkey project. But, boy, do I like doing it ...

Mythical Monkey said...

She must have been responsible.

I've heard that Raymond Burr read for the part of Paul Drake, and William Hopper was to play Perry Mason. You have to figure that Gail Patrick Jackson as producer ultimately gets credit for the switch. And given that the series ran for 271 episodes over nine seasons, it was the right choice.

That and choosing Fred Steiner's "Park Avenue Beat" as the title theme -- that's half the show's appeal right there.

mister muleboy said...


That and choosing Fred Steiner's "Park Avenue Beat" as the title theme -- that's half the show's appeal right there.


You would choose a link to "The Case of the Restless Redhead". . . .